The “Ask a Question” Show Playlist

Info on Narcissism

Here is a YouTube playlist of all the latest episodes of the “Ask a Question” Show in order.

If you aren’t familiar with the show, it’s where people submit a question about anything having to do with Narcissists, or recovery from a Narcissistic relationship, and I, along with the rest of the YouTube community, answer it. (Make sure to read the comments for the community’s feedback–as there is often a ton of great input from people that have “been there, done that”!)

If you have a question for the “Ask a Question” Show, email it here: AskAQuestion@NarcissistSupport.com

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Dana

I am a self-help junkie, former advocate for victims of domestic violence, current psychiatric RN, as well as being a recovering victim of Narcissistic abuse.

My goal is to educate, empower, and inspire other abuse victims in understanding more about what happened to them (and how to prevent it from happening again), as well as how to go on and rebuild an amazing life.

Even though I have had a lot of "in the trenches" experience with highly manipulative people of all kinds, I consider myself to be a student of Narcissism, mindset, motivation, healing, and life in general, and am by no means an expert on any of these topics.

It's for these reasons, that when you are reading my information that I encourage you to hold to what helps, and let the rest go.
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About Dana 252 Articles
I am a self-help junkie, former advocate for victims of domestic violence, current psychiatric RN, as well as being a recovering victim of Narcissistic abuse. My goal is to educate, empower, and inspire other abuse victims in understanding more about what happened to them (and how to prevent it from happening again), as well as how to go on and rebuild an amazing life. Even though I have had a lot of "in the trenches" experience with highly manipulative people of all kinds, I consider myself to be a student of Narcissism, mindset, motivation, healing, and life in general, and am by no means an expert on any of these topics. It's for these reasons, that when you are reading my information that I encourage you to hold to what helps, and let the rest go.

4 Comments

  1. I broke up with a person I’m sure was NPD after 5.5 months. I have remained no contact but he still tries to contact me (13 times since we broke up, changing emails, text, calls, snail mail.) We are both songwriters. He infiltrated my music groups and although I’ve been there over 8 years after 1 year he feels he is entitled to them. I can’t stand to be around him …it makes me physically ill. I am a professional musician and him taking these groups as his is affecting my career AND my health. The group supports me and wishes he would go away and set up a process for people to ban him if they chose but most people are just too nice to get want to get involved. The majority have unfriended him on FB on my behalf. However I still don’t feel safe to go if he is going to be there. I’m thinking of getting a restraining order. Can you get one for just emotional abuse? Should I get one”? The thought of going through all of this makes me even sicker but I don’t think he’ll ever leave me alone and I don’t want to be a hostage and prisoner from MY friends and group because of his sense of entitlement.

  2. I’d view what he’s doing as a form of stalking, so, yes, you could get a restraining order on him. I strongly encourage you to keep a papertrail of everything he’s doing so you can show the court. So keep all texts, a phone log of calls, emails, etc. Try to keep any communication with him in written format. …Since you have members of your group that are too nice to ban him, perhaps you guys could meet at another day, time, or location? Or perhaps, you could set up an additional meeting time, day, place with the same group, and start your own meeting. …I know he’s a pain in the butt. This is a form of “hoovering”, as well as harrassment, as they don’t like to lose power and control over their victim or over the situation. If he isn’t a musician, or you think he’s only there to bother you–then he may stop if you go “gray rock”.

    Here’s some links that might help:

    Gray Rock:
    http://www.thriveafterabuse.com/episode-1-of-the-ask-a-question-show/
    http://www.thriveafterabuse.com/going-gray-rock/

    Hoovering:
    http://www.thriveafterabuse.com/?s=hoovering (The first 4 or so posts are about hoovering).

    I’m sorry that you are going through this, and I hope you are able to shake him loose soon. …Just be careful, stay aware of your surroundings (these people can be unpredictable), and always, always, always go with your gut.

    (((hugs)))

  3. You know having the ability to recognize all the red flags is enlightening. Not only will you ever become a victim again, narcissists will avoid you as a target. Yet this knowledge is also double edged sword as having this ability inhibits one from taking chances as well as from making mistakes. I suppose it is better to be alone than be in an abusive relationship, yet learning what I have learned presents what many may consider as serious trust issues. It is essential to get to know someone before letting yourself from becoming emotionally attached yet in nearly 20 years, it has never worked out or continue any romantic relationship for more than a few months. Yes, this information is extremely valuable for those who cannot figure out why they remain victims relationship after relationship, yet I do not know how to move forward. Yet, no relationship is better than an abusive relationship yet it might mean living the rest of your life alone. For me it has been that way 20 years and may continue for another 20. Yet I do not think I could ever be a victim again, so I accept it. But who knows. Maybe lightning may still strike! I thought it did before, but now see that I was only a target! This information is both enlightening and disillusioning!

  4. Yes, other people out there will most likely think you are being hypervigilant. The only way to determine if this is the case, is (like you said) take time to get to know someone. Manipulative people like to move fast–so don’t let them. Take a relationship ro friendship at your speed. And really, I hope that the biggest take away in the red flags is more about you learning to trust your judgment. Deep down we all know when something is off, but for some reason we gloss over those red flags. Maybe we come from an abusive home, or maybe we are so starved out for attention and affection that we aren’t thinking clearly. Either reason will cause us to “settle for crumbs” and to choose people because they “aren’t that bad” (when in reality, they have a ton of problematic behavior). Gravitate towards relationships and friendships that are a 9+/10 on a scale of feeling nourishing to you. Anything less won’t work in the long term for you–and yes, those people are out there, and yes, you are worthy of having them in your life. 🙂

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